Most central HVAC systems in homes implement split air conditioners

It’s called a package HVAC system because the air handler and condenser unit are packaged together in a single enclosure

I’m on the market for a house. After savings for the past five years in a rundown apartment, I’m finally ready to take my step into home ownership. I scour several different home listing websites several times a day so I can find houses right after they’re posted online. LIke with jobs, home sales are on a first come, first serve basis. And if there are other hungry home buyers out there, you have to be vigilant and determined. However, I’m not opposed to buying something older. In fact, I am focusing on older houses based on the fact that many of them were built better than brand new construction. That’s at least true in this area. Often contractors slap together these homes at breakneck speed, cutting every possible corner at every step of the process. After what felt like months of looking, I started to find a handful of options that I wanted to see first hand. I called and made appointments for each location, but in the end it came down to a choice of three options at the most. Between my limited budget and the tight housing market, I wasn’t lucky enough to have an ocean of possibilities. One house was weird because the air conditioner was located on the roof. It’s called a package HVAC system because the air handler and condenser unit are packaged together in a single enclosure. Most homes have split systems where the air handler is in a garage, closet, or attic while the condenser is inside a metal enclosure on the lawn next to the side of the building.

 

Most central HVAC systems in homes implement split air conditioners